Econkids

Rutgers University Project on Economics and Children

EconKids Home New Picture Books in 2009 (First Word Q-Z) The Sisters 8, series / by Lauren Baratz-Logsted, with Greg Logsted and Jackie Logsted

The Sisters 8, series / by Lauren Baratz-Logsted, with Greg Logsted and Jackie Logsted

 

Title:  The Sisters 8, series
Author:  Lauren Baratz-Logsted, with Greg Logsted and Jackie Logsted
Illustrator: Lisa K. Weber
Publisher:  Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN:  Annie's Adventures (978-0-547-05338-7)
Durinda's Dangers (978-0-547-05339-4)
Georgia's Greatness (978-0-547-05340-0)
Jackie's Jokes (978-0-547-05328-8)

Year:  2009 (books 3 and 4); 2008 (books 1 and 2)

Concepts:  financial literacy, taxes, caring labor, wealth

Review:  On New Year’s Eve in 2007, the Huit octuplets encountered a major dilemma: their parents both went missing. The only clue was a note tucked away behind a loose stone in the drawing-room wall saying that each sister had to discover her own unique ability and gift before the whereabouts of their parents would become known.  Afraid that the authorities would split them up between separate relatives and foster homes, the girls decided to keep their parents’ disappearance a secret, especially from their mean teacher and their nosy neighbor.

This decision meant they would need to become self-sufficient, not an easy task for eight almost-eight-year-olds who had become quite accustomed to a comfortable way of life made possible by their parents’ high-pay occupations as model (father) and inventor (mother). So began the big mystery and the premise behind this book series, with each book highlighting, in consecutive months, the discovery of one sister’s special talent and gift.  

Cleverly tucked away in these pages are a series of themes related to financial literacy and caring labor since the sisters need to learn how to manage their household. For example, in Book 1, Annie has to pay the bills, which involves learning how to write a check and understanding the interest rate charges on credit card balances. Perhaps even more difficult to decipher are income taxes, and when April rolls around in Book 4 the girls need to file their parents’ tax returns before the dreaded Tax Day.  With their blend of humor and adventure, these books provide readers with an enjoyable opportunity to think more about the dynamics between family members and what each person contributes to a household.

Review by:  Rutgers University Project on Economics and Children

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